Tuesday, July 03, 2007

boy and girl with globe Second Plane of Development Ages 6-12 NAMC Montessori Philosophy
Continuing our series on learning about the four planes of development, we move on to the second plane, which encompasses ages six to twelve. The second plane of development is the plane of childhood. The absorbent mind, so prevalent from birth to age six, gives way to the conscious mind in the second plane of development. Learning now takes place at a slower, steadier pace. Children in the second plane of development are much less drawn to the repetition of activities, unless there is some variation involved.

Children in the second plane of development are also no longer solitary beings. They now tend to gravitate towards others in their environment. Around the age of 6, children begin to become interested in their classmates and are learning how to get along. They start to choose to work with others on projects of mutual interest. By 11 or 12, most students prefer to work with others rather than individually. Keep reading to learn more about the changes during the second plane of development.

The Second Plane of Development:  Ages 6-12 - Montessori Philosophy


As they develop, children in the second plane of development also expand their social network. They begin to show a genuine interest in others, whether it is within their local community or in a more global sense of awareness. Montessori elementary programs take advantage of this sensitive period of cultural awareness by providing a wide range of opportunities for children to explore their culture, and that of others, through the study of history, geography, language arts, and the sciences.
Children at the second plane lose their desire for physical order and develop a strong moral sense of order. They have a very strong sense of justice and perceived fairness and following the rules becomes very important. They need good role models as they learn about values.

This is the sensitive period for the imagination, for seeing the possibilities in real experiences. Montessori elementary programs often begin the school year with the telling of the Great Lessons. These five imaginative epics present a holistic vision of knowledge, drawing on material from the various disciplines. They are meant to spur the imagination of elementary students, thus initiating exploration into the curriculum. This Cosmic Education tells how the universe is not a random place or something that “just happened,” but shows how each particle, substance, species, and event has a specific purpose and a contribution to make to the development of others. Dr. Montessori wanted children to understand the amount of gratitude that human beings owe to other parts of the universe and to fully realize that without them and their contributions to the interconnected whole, we could not live.

Between the ages of 6 and 12, children experience great growth physically. However, what stands out greater than their physical growth is their capacity for great mental growth. The Montessori elementary curriculum was created with this in mind. The lower elementary (6-9) curriculum takes advantage of the child’s natural enthusiasm for learning and lays the foundation for skills needed at the next level. The upper elementary curriculum (9-12) not only focuses on the acquisition of knowledge, but adds a level of thoughtfulness by inspiring children to think and question.
In the second plane, children will reason about what has become part of their lives through the power of imagination and intelligence. They need to hear stories of greatness and goodness and moral values. The mind of the elementary child concerns itself with building a conscience, that inner sense of what is right and wrong. During this period of growth, they need to know that the adults in their lives love, respect, and understand them.

NAMC offers a complete range of Montessori Lower Elementary (6-9) and Upper Elementary (9-12) curriculum resources.

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As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, July 3, 2007.

6 comments:

  1. Is there a difference between AMS and AMI training and which one has a better possibility of getting hired. I am considering training and am considering tutiton costs and job possibilities later.
    Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  2. AMS and AMI training programs differ in their manner of training and their requirements. In the end, choosing the right training program is a personal decision that should be based on how well each program suits your needs. We wish you all the best with your decision. If you have any additional questions, we would be happy to hear from you again. Please feel free to contact us directly at info@montessoritraining.net.

    ReplyDelete
  3. There is a wonderful children's book in France that demonstrates the idea of food chains, and thus perfectly fits in with the idea of cosmic education and that all things are inter-related and interdependent. To my knowledge, this book has not yet been translated into English.
    It is called, "Croque. La nourissante histoire de la vie", written by Aleksandra Mizielinska .

    Here is the link to it's amazon page:

    http://www.amazon.fr/gp/product/2355041342?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00

    ReplyDelete
  4. How will the children be able to be redirected in the lower elementary meaning how will I redirect their behavior when they are being rude? I know the children are developing their own opinions and autonomy. However I'm curious as to how do I react when the children are rude to their teachers. In its rules are important and role models are important I know the teachers supposed to be the role model. But how much rudeness is acceptable? For the sake of the child finding their own autonomy?

    ReplyDelete
  5. 55. The second plane of development is a curious time (6-10 years) when children long to hear stories of goodness, greatness, and desire to develop a deep sense of right and wrong, or morality. They no longer desire the repetition once practiced in the first plane of development, but rather have a sense of adventure to explore and learn new things with some variation.

    ReplyDelete
  6. At the second plane of development, where children are less drawn to the repetition of activities unless there is some variation involved, it is important for the teacher to gauge whether the students are ready for the next level/variation. This has been the most difficult part of teaching to me, a beginner in the Montessori Method. The teacher needs to make sure he/she has some kind of documentation of his/her observations so when the students are ready, they are given the variation. This is the perfect time to utilize the Mastery Checklists and perhaps make a variation of it in excel with the names of all students at that level, in an effort to quickly ascertain who needs the next level.

    ReplyDelete

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